FAQ DVD Burning

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I purchased Vuze Plus. How do I burn a DVD?

If you purchased Vuze Plus and entered your activation code into Vuze, you should already have the necessary plugin to burn a DVD. Simply drag a video file from your Library in Vuze or from a folder on your system to the "+ Create New DVD" item in the left sidebar under "DVD Burn".

In the "New DVD" popup, give your DVD a memorable name, select the correct video format for your region, and click "OK". Vuze will take you to the DVD Burn screen for your new DVD project. Here you can see how much space you are using, how much is available, and a list of the files in your DVD project. Note that if you try to add more video than your DVD can hold, you will receive an error, and you will need to remove one or more files from the DVD project by clicking on it and clicking the "Delete" button at the top of the screen.

If you like, you can double click the titles of each of the video files to rename them. You can also drag the files around to reorder them however you like. When you are satisfied with the DVD project, click "Burn DVD". Vuze will prompt you to make sure you have a blank DVD inserted in your drive. Once again, click "Burn DVD". Vuze will begin converting your videos to the proper format for playback. If you did not heed the advice before and insert a blank DVD, you will be prompted one last time to do so. Otherwise Vuze will simply transfer your videos to the DVD and eject the disc.

Take a look at video showing this process.

Can I burn a DVD if I don't have Plus?

Yes, as long as you have upgraded to Vuze 4.4 you will have access to one trial DVD Burn. Simply drag a video file from your Library in Vuze or from a folder on your system to the "+ Create New DVD" item in the left sidebar under "DVD Burn" and follow the prompts to have Vuze install the DVD Burn plugin. Once it has completed, you will be asked again to drag the files to the "+ Create New DVD" item.

In the "New DVD" popup, give your DVD a memorable name, select the correct video format for your region, and click "OK". Vuze will take you to the DVD Burn screen for your new DVD project. Here you can see how much space you are using, how much is available, and a list of the files in your DVD project.

Note: if you try to add more video than your DVD can hold, you will receive an error, and you will need to remove one or more files from the DVD project by clicking on it and clicking the "Delete" button at the top of the screen.

If you like, you can double click the titles of each of the video files to rename them. You can also drag the files around to reorder them however you like. When you are satisfied with the DVD project, click "Burn DVD". We will politely remind you that you have 1 complimentary DVD burn. If you are so blown away by what Vuze Plus has to offer at this point, click "Upgrade", otherwise click "Burn now". Vuze will prompt you to make sure you have a blank DVD inserted in your drive. Once again, click "Burn DVD". Vuze will begin converting your videos to the proper format for playback. If you did not heed my advice before and insert a blank DVD, you will be prompted one last time to do so now. Otherwise Vuze will simply transfer your videos to the DVD and eject the disc.


What types of files can I burn to a DVD?

DVD Burn was developed in response to one of our most frequent customer requests. You told us you wanted the ability to watch your downloaded content somewhere other than your computer's screen, and we listened. As such, Vuze can burn almost any type of video file you throw at it onto a playable, watchable DVD, for playback on your TV.


What types of media (i.e. discs) will DVD Burn work with?

In general, any kind of single-layer writeable DVD disc should work with Vuze Plus, however it has been our experience that the most consistent burns stem from using single-layer DVD+R discs made by well known manufacturers (Sony, Maxell, Verbatim, etc.)

Some DVD-R discs are incompatible with certain DVD burners when using Vuze Plus, preventing a small number of users from being able to burn using DVD-R discs. If this applies to you, you will receive an error message which references Error 35584. This is an uncommon error, and we are still working to resolve it. In the meantime, your best bet is to use DVD+R discs with Vuze Plus.

Here's a good reference for finding quality compatible media: http://www.videohelp.com/dvdmedia

Does Vuze allow me to make data DVDs to backup content I have downloaded?

No. Vuze is intended to allow you to create watchable DVDs for playback on a DVD player. It's all about enabling you to find, download, and play your content where you want it, and how you want it.


Does DVD Burn work where I live?

DVD Burn should work on any NTSC or PAL compatible player. While there may be problems with some older DVD players, we have successfully played back DVDs on players that were around in a time when Y2K bugs were preparing to wipe out humanity.


I am unable to burn a playable DVD. What do I do? (aka Troubleshooting)

There are several reasons a DVD may not play. Here are some of the most common causes of failed playback:

  • Are you using a DVD disc compatible with your playback equipment? There are several kinds of burnable DVDs available. DVD-R discs were the original burnable discs developed by the official DVD Forum in the late 90's, and they are supported by DVD players going back to that time. DVD+R was developed by a group of the top DVD manufacturing companies (Sony) in 2002. Almost all modern DVD burners can burn to either DVD-R or DVD+R, however, DVD players manufactured prior to 2004 may have problems playing back DVDs burned on DVD+R discs. In short, if your DVD player was made prior to 2004, you will want to burn to DVD-R discs to ensure proper playback. If it was manufactured in 2004 or later, you should be fine burning to either kind of disc.
  • It's also possible that your DVD burner or player has experienced a malfunction.

The components that write and read data to DVD discs are very sensitive and may become damaged over time. If you can burn a disc and play it on the same computer but not on an external DVD player, it's possible that the DVD player is broken. To test this, make sure you can play another DVD in the player. If you can't, then it's probably time for a new DVD player. If you can, then it's also possible that the DVD burner in your computer is no longer writing data to DVDs properly. This can sometimes happen even if the DVD is playable on the computer you used to burn the DVD.

Therefore, if you can burn a DVD using the proper disc type (DVD-R / DVD+R) and format (NTSC / PAL) and can play it on your computer but not on an external DVD player, then it's likely that your DVD burner on your computer has degraded to the point that the DVDs it creates are no longer readable by other players.


I downloaded some video files, but when I tried to burn them to a DVD I received the following error message: "The files you are trying to add to your DVD playlist do not contain any compatible video files. Please check your files and try again." What happened?

It is possible that, although the torrents you downloaded were categorized as "videos", they didn't actually contain any compatible video files within them. DVD Burn looks deep into the heart of each and every file in your playlist to attempt to divine it's true nature. Sadly, sometimes torrents are not what they seem, especially if their contents are compressed into multiple RAR files. If you are certain that the file is a pure video but you are still getting this error, please check the support resources for more information.


How does DVD Burn handle multiple videos?

DVD Burn makes a best-guess effort at determining the best parameters for conversion quality. It generally favors quality over quantity, and works best when burning only a *single* source video track, as it can easily determine the optimal bitrate given the source video's duration.

When burning multiple source video tracks, the auto-sizing may not work as well, so it is suggested that you burn to separate dvd discs if you have trouble fitting all the tracks on a single disc. Either individually remove tracks after dropping in a multi-file download, or add them individually by right-clicking the download in your Library and selecting Show Details, where you can drag and drop individual files from the 'Files' tab view.


Does DVD Burn support Dual Layer (8.5GB) DVDs?

DVD Burn currently does not yet support burning to dual-layer / double-density DVDs. You may be able to get it to burn by inserting a normal 4.7GB blank, but larger sizes won't work.


I burned a video with subtitles using DVD Burn, but when I play the DVD back on my player, the subtitles don't appear. What gives?

Unfortunately, Vuze does not support burning subtitles to DVDs unless the video file actually contains the subtitle stream. Think of it this way...video files have both a video and an audio stream, with the audio stream tightly coupled to the video so that when someone's mouth moves you hear her voice in sync with her lip movement. Those audio and video streams start out as separate files and somewhere along the way someone merges the streams in a single file.

Subtitles are similar, except that many times the subtitle "stream" is not merged or embedded in the audio/video streams. This is due to the fact that you can't really "mute" subtitles if they are embedded. They would always be on, annoying all of the people who understand the spoken language natively.

In short, if you are lucky enough to come across a video file which has the desired language's subtitles embedded into it, then you are in luck. These types of files will burn to DVD just like they play in the player, with the subtitles and everything. If, however, you have come across the scenario of separate video file and subtitle file, Vuze will be unable to embed the subtitles in the video.

There are a number of tools available that can help you merge video files with subtitle files. A quick Google search for "merge video and subtitles" will point you in the right direction. But beware, the process can be complicated and time-consuming.


How long should it take to burn a DVD ?

The time required to fully convert and burn a DVD will vary, depending on the length of the video, the speed of your burner, and the CPU horsepower of your computer. Much of the time will be taken up by transcoding the source video into the standard DVD video format, as well as the actual burning of data to disk. An hour or two, or even longer for a full-length movie is not unusual.


What does Error 35584 mean ?

Error #35584 indicates that the native burning software crashed. We are currently investigating this issue and have no software workaround yet. However, from user reports, it appears to happen only when using DVD-Rs ("minus" R) with certain DVD burners, so we highly suggest you try burning again using a DVD+R ("plus" R) disc. Our records show significantly higher success rates with +R blanks. If this does solve your problem, please tell us so we can tell our other users with this problem!

I get an error saying a file is missing/unreadable

Sometimes anti-virus programs or other gremlins can cause parts of the DVD burning feature to go missing. To try and fix this problem please re-install the DVD Burning plugin (this is the component within Vuze that supports the burn feature). Go to Tools->Plugins->Uninstallation Wizard (option near the end of the menu) and check the box next to the 'DVD Burning' plugin. Follow the instructions to uninstall the plugin. Then restart Vuze. The plugin should automatically re-install and hopefully your problem is fixed.

How do I manually set the burning speed ?

To help diagnose and prevent burning "hardware" errors during a burn, we recommend you manually set the burn speed to 2X. You can do this by going to the DVD Burning plugin config in the Options (win) / Preferences (osx) panel and setting the Burn Speed value to 2.

What if I get a Your DVD May Be Out Of Space! warning ?

You should be able to fit at least 2.5 hours worth of video runtime per blank dvd. Sometimes the pre-burn space estimator isn't so accurate (particularly for multi-file sets), so try just closing the warning dialog and hitting Burn anyway.

How do burn a selection of files from a download ?

When a download contains multiple video files you can select the ones you want to burn by clicking on the 'twistie' next to the download to open up the list of files it contains, then drag and drop the ones you want onto the sidebar DVD entry

Can I Pre-transcode files to see how much space they will take on the DVD ?

Yes, you can do this. First add the movie to the DVD as usual. Next select the 'In Progress' entry under 'Device Playback' in the sidebar. This will show the files that are queued for transcoding for the DVD. You can select movie and then hit the 'start' button in the toolbar to start transcoding the movie.

  • NOTE if you are running Vuze 4.7.0.2 you will need to join the Beta program as this contains a required fix

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When the transcoding is complete the 'Estimated Size' column shown when you select the DVD in the sidebar will be updated with the actual size and the DVD's space availability updated.